If you think all draperies look the same, take a closer look at the top of each. It’s not just about the fabric. The heading on your curtains speaks volumes about your style — sometimes more than the fabric itself. From understated to dramatic, a well-chosen curtain style can greatly complement the tone of your room.
So we hope you will take a few minutes to read this information on various heading styles and order the ones that best suit your individual style.

Grommet/Eyelet

Suitable for: Curtain poles only.
Style Notes: Stylish, contemporary and unfussy. Great choice for an up-to-date, minimalist look. Suitable for all fabrics and a popular choice for striped and symmetrical fabric patterns.
Each curtain has even number of eyelets regularly spaced across the width. Very easy to hang as the big eyelet rings slide straight on the drapery pole. The curtains hang in wide, loose folds, and stack back fully and neatly, so offer a good option if you have little space to the side of your window.
Grommet style heading may not be suitable for very wide curtains as they cannot run past the pole support brackets.

Tab Top

Suitable for: Curtain poles only.
Styles Notes: For a relaxed, laid back setting, this is a modern and less formal heading. Suitable for all fabrics but ideal for light curtains. Often used for unlined voiles or sheer curtains that are rarely opened or decorative drapes that are rarely closed as tab tops may not glide along the rod easily. A visually impactful style when used with traditional timber poles.
Loops of fabric material are sewn to the top of the curtain at regular intervals. The curtain rod is fed through the loops. The tabs are made from the same fabric as the curtains and are included in the total curtain length.
Like grommet tops, tab tops can't run past the pole support brackets, so may not be suitable as very wide curtains.

Pencil Pleat

Suitable for: Both curtain tracks and poles.
Style Notes: A popular and classic style for a casual and relaxed setting. A smarter alternative to other traditional styles such as the gathered pleat.
Each curtain has small folds at the top that are gathered closely together to resemble a row of pencils laid side by side. They are created by pulling the cords on the heading tape and winding them around a cord tidy to keep the pleats in place. Pencil pleats offer a highly adjustable option as cords can be pulled to achieve the desired gather and curtain width.

Rod Pocket Style

Suitable for: Curtain poles only.
Styles Notes: A simple and versatile curtain heading that can be gathered to suit a range of track widths. Best used for decorative drapes that are not shut often as these may not glide along the rod easily. Also called tailored curtains for their tailored straight look.
A pocket is sewn across the top of the curtain panel through which the curtain rod is inserted. Rod pocket is included in curtain length.

Double Pinch/Dutch Pleat

Suitable for: Both curtain tracks and poles.
Styles Notes: Full, formal & elegant. Double pinch pleats create a more formal tailored look and because of the depth of the pleat, suit a long curtain and a bold pattern or sumptuous material like velvet. Double pleats give the same attractive uniform finish to curtains as the triple pleat but with only two pinches in every pleat.
Pleats are created by making folded creases in the stiff buckram and pinched together one or two inches from the top of the drape, like a V shape, that then flow down in a tailored fashion. Hooks are then inserted directly into the back of the heading.
As pinch pleat is a 'fixed' heading (the pleats are sewn by hand to a fixed heading and fitted with hooks and cannot be loosened), it is important to provide an accurate track/pole width when ordering pinch pleats. This will allow us to gather your curtains to the correct width.

Inverted Pleat

Suitable for: Both curtain tracks and poles.
Styles Notes: A modern stylish heading for a full and sumptuous look. Formal yet laid back. Works especially well in a masculine decor setting. Better suited to wide windows as the curtains need more room to stack back at the side of the window.
Inverted pleat curtains have a single pleat at the back, sometimes called a box pleat, placed at even intervals along the top. Fabric is folded into pleats on the front and on the back, creating flat, boxy folds.
Since this is a 'fixed' heading (the pleats are sewn by hand, made to a fixed width, fitted with hooks that cannot be loosened), it is important to provide an accurate track/pole width when ordering inverted pleats. This will allow us to gather your curtains to the correct width.

Triple Pinch Pleat/French Pleat

Suitable for: Both curtain tracks and poles.
Styles Notes: The most popular pinch pleat. For a classic, formal and elegant style. Made the same way as single and double pleats but the added third pinch makes these curtains very full, plush and luxurious. Because of the depth of the pleat, this heading suits a long curtain and a bold pattern or sumptuous material like velvet. A great addition to any traditional or elegant styled space since it offers a dramatic, yet timeless look.
Fabric is gathered delicately into three little folds and then pinched together to create one pleat. The pinched pleats are spaced evenly apart, and weighted at the bottom of the seams. This creates a tailored look at the top, and as the fabric drops down toward the floor, the pleats control the fullness allowing the drape to fall smoothly and evenly.
As pinch pleat is a 'fixed' heading (the pleats are sewn by hand to a fixed heading and fitted with hooks and cannot be loosened), it is important to provide an accurate track/pole width when ordering pinch pleats. This will allow us to gather your curtains to the correct width.

Goblet Pleat

Suitable for: Both curtain tracks and poles.
Styles Notes: Possibly the most traditional and formal heading style on offer. Creates a sumptuous statement and works well with heavier, opulent fabrics. Especially suitable for curtains with long drop. A nice option for grand buildings or a lofty period property.
Goblet pleated curtains have a strip of stiffener sewn into the heading, which is pleated at the base to create a goblet-shaped design. Goblets are placed at intervals and are consistent within a pair of curtains.
Just like pinch pleats, this is a 'fixed' heading (the pleats are sewn by hand to a fixed heading and fitted with hooks and cannot be loosened), so it is important to provide an accurate track/pole width when ordering goblet pleats. This will allow us to gather your curtains to the correct width.
Not recommended for smaller windows as these curtains need more room to stack back at the side of the window than the contemporary styles.